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Feminine Mysteries in the Bible : The Soul Teachings of the Daughters of the Goddess

Baker & Taylor

Feminine Mysteries in the Bible : The Soul Teachings of the Daughters of the Goddess

$15.00
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An exploration of the repressed, esoteric feminine mysteries in the Bible through the lives of four women, all archetypes of the sacred prostitute

• Shows how these four archetypal women represent the four stages of development of soul consciousness

• Reveals how the fear of the power of the sacred prostitute led to a rejection of female sexuality and a destructive dualistic notion of men and women

• Explains how the dogma of the Immaculate Conception represents the repression of the divine feminine in Christianity

In Feminine Mysteries in the Bible, Ruth Rusca unveils sacred mysteries of the feminine and the alchemical relationship of the male and female forces at the heart of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Drawing on over 30 years of research, she explores four archetypal women in the Bible: Tamar, the sacred prostitute; Rahab, the meretrix; Ruth, who redeems the soul; and Bathsheba, the daughter of the Goddess. These women--sacred prostitutes one and all--represent the indestructible feminine life force, the wisdom of the Goddess, and the transformative power of the soul, and they symbolize the four stages of the development of soul consciousness.

Mary, mother of Jesus, is the quintessence of these four women, but Rusca shows that the dogma of the Immaculate Conception has repressed the significance of Mary and subverted the divine feminine in Christianity due to the church’s fear of women and their life-giving energy. These women pass an imperishable feminine life force from generation to generation, and understanding their lives creates a path to overcoming the destructive tendencies of dualistic “male-female” thinking--a duality that profanes feminine sexuality and mysteries rather than revering and celebrating them.